BARKA to Implement First Major Menstrual Cup Project in Burkina Faso

BARKA to Implement First Major Menstrual Cup Project in Burkina Faso

Menstrual Cups Coming Soon to Burkina Faso in Project Afric’up: Ya Soma

Dining for Women funds first major menstrual cup project in Burkina Faso, to be led by The BARKA Foundation, Menstru’elles, and Femme International. 

Burkina Faso- November 30, 2020

For Immediate Release:

Click here to access the online distributed Press Release.

The BARKA Foundation is pleased to announce it has received a grant for a menstrual cup pilot project in Burkina Faso from Dining for Women, a community of women engaged in education, advocacy, and grant-making to build the movement for global gender equality. BARKA will collaborate with a budding Ouagadougou-based social enterprise Menstru’elles and Femme International, a menstrual health NGO in Africa that has successfully worked with cups for 8 years.

“Together we will break the silence surrounding the taboo of menstruation, provide comprehensive training on Menstrual, Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights and lay the groundwork for sustainable cup and menstrual health programming on a national level”, said Ina Anahata, BARKA’s co-founder.

“Menstrual cups are a financially- and environmentally-sustainable tool that decreases many of the barriers women and girls face during menstruation. Menstruation is a normal function for half the world’s population, yet brings about a host of practical problems as well as social stigma and shame. A lack of high-quality, available, and affordable menstrual products makes it hard for women to go to work or school, have a social life, and move about freely.  Too often women and girls resort to unhygienic alternatives or do without any feasible menstrual management solution, creating a gender equity issue that impacts their quality of life, their families, the economy, and society at large”, said Jennifer Rubli, Research and M&E Coordinator with Femme International, and Master Teacher of two comprehensive workshops for this project.

This project, called Afric’up: Ya Soma (Ya Soma is an expression in Moré, Burkina’s most widely spoken language, which means “It’s Good”) is the first major menstrual cup project in Burkina Faso history and among the first in all of West Africa which has yet to adopt widespread use of cups. “There is strong early demand for cups in Burkina which we expect to continue, and our social enterprise will assure a sustainable supply of cups post-project”, said Elodie Koundouno, founder of Menstru’elles.

According to Dr. Veena Khandke, Director of Grants and Partnerships, Dining for Women, “Our donors are excited about Dining for Women funding its first project ever in the landlocked nation of Burkina Faso. The project partners are all ideally suited for the task—BARKA has deep knowledge of the socio-cultural context of Burkina, Menstru’elles will be able to sell cups after project completion to meet the demand this project creates, and Femme is a cup expert in Africa which will lend its tried and true methodology to ensure successful outcomes.”

The pilot will use a bottom-up and top-down approach that engages key government, community, and religious stakeholders, while partnering with women to demonstrate feasibility and demand. The project will partner with ten community health centers and local associations focusing on issues of women’s health in Ouagadougou. “We’re thrilled to have this opportunity to introduce menstrual cups to more than 1200 women and girls in Burkina Faso. Cups are a safe, comfortable, cost-effective, and sustainable solution, with the potential to be a game changer for menstruating women and girls in Burkina”, said Esu Anahata, BARKA Foundation co-founder.

About The BARKA Foundation (BARKA)

The BARKA Foundation is a 501c3 nonprofit charitable organization, has UN NGO affiliation and Consultative Status with ECOSOC, and is based in both the US and Burkina Faso. BARKA implements a wide range of projects in areas of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), women’s empowerment, education, sustainable agriculture and the cultural arts. Since 2006 the NGO has benefitted over 65,000 rural villagers. BARKA is committed to the concept of reciprocity by building bridges between schools, civic organizations and individuals in Burkina Faso and the United States.

For more information, or to support this project visit the BARKA Foundation website at https://barkafoundation.org.

Press Contact: Esu Anahata

Email: TeamBARKA@barkafoundation.org

About Menstru’elles

Sisterhood SARL, a local social enterprise visible with the commercial brand “Menstru’elles”, is dedicated to providing access to cost-effective, healthy and environmentally-friendly menstrual solutions, while reducing stigma around menstruation and sharing positive and valuable information about Menstrual Health. They are cup pioneers in Burkina Faso, with direct and indirect sales through women ambassadors, and small-scale distribution programs. Although newly active, the team is already referenced as cup experts and plays a major role in raising awareness among health actors, associations and institutions to promote the safe and broader use of cups.

For more information or to support this project visit the Menstru’elles website at https://www.menstruelles.com

Press Contact: Elodie Koundouno

Email: elodie@menstruelles.com

About Femme International

Femme International is a menstrual health NGO in East Africa that uses education, conversation, and distribution to break taboos and address the barriers people face as a result of menstruation. They have been implementing menstrual interventions and working with menstrual cups for 8 years, working with nearly 20,000 menstruators. Additionally, they are M&E experts and working to bridge the gap between research and programme implementation, ensuring evidence is accessible and practical.

For more information or to support this project visit the Femme International website at www.femmeinternational.org

Press Contact: Jen Rubli

Email: jennifer@femmeinternational.org

About Dining for Women

Dining for Women is a powerful community of women and allies engaged in education, advocacy, and grant making to build the movement for global gender equality.

We have hundreds of chapters across the U.S., where members come together to learn about issues impacting women and girls globally, give charitably to support organizations working to empower and create opportunities for women and girls globally, and advocate for international development aid that supports women’s interests.

For more information or to support this project visit the Dining for Women website at www.diningforwomen.org

Press Contact: Dr. Veena Khandke

Email: veena@diningforwomen.org

BARKA’s Work Towards the Achievement of the SDGs

BARKA’s Work Towards the Achievement of the SDGs

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With its activities in 2015, the BARKA Foundation has made numerous contributions to the improvement of living conditions of the people of the eastern region of Burkina Faso, which fall within the logic of the SDGs. This is particularly true for the WASH, health and education related SDGs. The foundations two main projects of 2015 – a 5-Village WASH Project, and a Social Arts project which encouraged discussion of the need for clean water and good hygiene through a locally produced theatre play – can serve to highlight some ways in which the SDGs were promoted in BARKA’s work.

The following are two examples of goals and related targets which were directly addressed by BARKA’s activities:
Goal 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
– By 2030, reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births
– By 2030, end preventable deaths of newborns and children under 5 years of age, with all countries aiming to reduce neonatal mortality to at least as low as 12 per 1,000 live births and under-5 mortality to at least as low as 25 per 1,000 live births
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The play “Water for the Present and the Future” promoted better hygiene and management of water sources in villages and schools. At the play’s dramatic centre lies the death of a young child from acute diarrhoea. The villagers decide to improve their hygiene practices and take better care of their well in reaction to this traumatic event. The play was written in collaboration between BARKA and the theatre specialists from Escape Culturel Gambidi and the involvement of local actors and artists in the writing process ensured that it would reflect the reality and life experiences of the people of Burkina’s eastern region. The play was enthusiastically received by villages and schools alike and commitments were made to improve hygiene and water management practices.

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Goal 6: Ensure access to water and sanitation for all
– By 2030, achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all
– By 2030, achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and end open defecation, paying special attention to the needs of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations
– Support and strengthen the participation of local communities in improving water and sanitation management
The core activities of the 5-Village WASH Project were the construction of 4 wells in villages of great need in the region and of six blocks of latrines in four schools. The sites of the wells were chosen using the method of Water Accounting: Maps of the partner village’s water points were created and analysed to identify the sites with the greatest need. The participation of local communities and their ownership of the wells was ensured through the training and continued support of village water point committees. Construction of latrines was accompanied by hygiene education for teachers and the donation of hand washing stations to schools. The latrines are all gender specific to ensure that girls will feel comfortable to use them – contributing to the achievement of a target under SDG 5, to “eliminate gender disparities in education and ensure equal access to all levels of education and vocational training”.
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Koosongo: Ceramic Filters for Burkina Faso

Koosongo: Ceramic Filters for Burkina Faso

 

Koosongo (a Moré word for “good water”) is a social venture founded by The BARKA Foundation with cooperation from Poceram (a Burkinabè ceramics company) to combat the crisis of waterborne disease in Burkina Faso through the production, sale and distribution of ceramic water filters (CWFs). • Burkina Faso, a small, landlocked country, is a West African nation of 16 million people 90% of whom are subsistence farmers without reliable access to clean water. • In Burkina Faso, one in five children dies from a preventable waterborne disease before reaching the age of five. • More than 70% of the national water market spending occurs in the bottom two Base of the Pyramid (BOP) income groups. A reliable, cost-effective product for safe drinking water that addresses this BOP income group is lacking on the market. Koosongo addresses this problem by providing a simple, affordable and effective technology that Burkinabè families need to break the devastating cycle of waterborne disease. As a pioneering venture, it is poised to be the first mover in a market with 10.5 million potential customers in Burkina alone. KOOSONGO: CERAMIC FILTERS FOR BURKINA FASO  NGOs and urban middle-class customers buy filters at full price resulting in a profit for Koosongo Koosongo subsidizes the cost of filter making it affordable for the resource-poor rural population. CWFs will be produced in-country using primarily materials that Burkina has in ample supply - red clay and sawdust. For the urban market, filters will be sold and distributed through a network of selected pre-existing retail stores. In peri-urban and rural regions, a team of trained entrepreneurs comprised mainly of women (Koosongo Filter Ambassadors) will travel from village to village to educate on hygiene and the importance of clean drinking water while providing filter demonstrations and selling filters at a subsidized price. Sales to NGOs will allow Koosongo’s CWFs to reach the poorest of the poor in more remote areas. Social Return on Investment (SROI): 14:1 Within 7 years every $1 spent on Koosongo will yield a $14 return on its investment in the social impact it achieves:  waterborne disease  economic productivity  school attendance  quality jobs for Burkinabè Dr. Mark Sobsey Dr. Susan Murcott Dr. Wole Soboyejo Next-Phase: 12-month Market Test BARKA is currently seeking funds for startup capital to sufficiently train Poceram artists, establish quality control procedures and test both the urban and rural markets. Koosongo will establish a network of retailers in Ouagadougou, Burkina’s capitol, and train women to become Koosongo Filter Ambassadors in the village and peri-urban market. Focus groups will be conducted to gather key data to determine optimal pricing, packaging and product differentiation. Board of Advisors Koosongo has assembled the world’s leading filter experts to advise this project. • Mark Sobsey, Professor of Environmental Microbiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill • Susan Murcott, Founder and CEO, Pure Home Water (Ghana-based filter business) • Wole Soboyejo, Founder of Filtron, Nigeria-based filter business; Princeton Professor • 2iE: Burkina Faso’s internationally renowned water research institute (water research institute will oversee quality control) • Peter Chartrand, US Director, Potters for Peace • Curt & Cathy Bradner, Co-Founders, Thirst-Aid (created 9 filter factories in Myanmar) Awards • BARKA Foundation’s business plan was a semi-finalist in the Global Social Venture Competition • Koosongo co-founder Esu Anahata won 1st Place in the Ariane de Rothschilds Fellowship business plan competition Board of Advisors 2iE Peter Chartrand Curt & Cathy Bradner The BARKA Foundation: c/o Ina & Esu PO Box 2, Burlington, ME 04417 | Tel: 413-446-7466 Foundation BARKA: BP 88 Fada N’Gourma, Burkina Faso, West Africa | Tel: 00 226 24 77 07 43 | www.barkafoundation.org1-Pager-Ceramic-Filters-EN_A4-2

 

Koosongo (a Moré word for “good water”) is a social venture founded by The BARKA Foundation with cooperation from Poceram (a Burkinabè ceramics company) to combat the crisis of waterborne disease in Burkina Faso through the production, sale and distribution of ceramic water filters (CWFs).

  • Burkina Faso, a small, landlocked country, is a West African nation of 16 million people 90% of whom are subsistence farmers without reliable access to clean water.
  • In Burkina Faso, one in five children dies from a preventable waterborne disease before reaching the age of five.
  • More than 70% of the national water market spending occurs in the bottom two Base of the Pyramid (BOP) income groups.

    A reliable, cost-effective product for safe drinking water that addresses this BOP income group is lacking on the market. Koosongo addresses this problem by providing a simple, affordable and effective technology that Burkinabè families need to break the devastating cycle of waterborne disease. As a pioneering venture, it is poised to be the

    first mover in a market with 10.5 million potential customers in Burkina alone.

KOOSONGO: CERAMIC FILTERS FOR BURKINA FASO

NGOs and urban middle-class customers buy filters at full price resulting in a profit for Koosongo

Koosongo subsidizes the cost of filter making it affordable for the resource-poor rural population.

CWFs will be produced in-country using primarily materials that Burkina has in ample supply – red clay and sawdust. For the urban market, filters will be sold and distributed through a network of selected pre-existing retail stores. In peri-urban and rural regions, a team
of trained entrepreneurs comprised mainly of women (Koosongo Filter Ambassadors) will travel from village
to village to educate on hygiene and the importance of clean drinking water while providing filter demonstrations and selling filters at a subsidized price. Sales to NGOs will allow Koosongo’s CWFs to reach the poorest of the poor in more remote areas.

Social Return on Investment (SROI): 14:1

Within 7 years every $1 spent on Koosongo will yield a $14 return on its investment in the social impact it achieves:

 waterborne disease
 economic productivity
 school attendance
 quality jobs for Burkinabè

Dr. Mark Sobsey

Dr. Susan Murcott

Dr. Wole Soboyejo

Next-Phase: 12-month Market Test

BARKA is currently seeking funds for startup capital
to sufficiently train Poceram artists, establish quality control procedures and test both the urban and rural markets. Koosongo will establish a network of retailers in Ouagadougou, Burkina’s capitol, and train women to become Koosongo Filter Ambassadors in the village and peri-urban market. Focus groups will be conducted to gather key data to determine optimal pricing, packaging and product differentiation.

Board of Advisors

Koosongo has assembled the world’s leading filter experts to advise this project.

  • Mark Sobsey, Professor of Environmental Microbiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • Susan Murcott, Founder and CEO, Pure Home Water (Ghana-based filter business)
  • Wole Soboyejo, Founder of Filtron, Nigeria-based filter business; Princeton Professor
  • 2iE: Burkina Faso’s internationally renowned water research institute (water research institute will oversee quality control)
  • Peter Chartrand, US Director, Potters for Peace
  • Curt & Cathy Bradner, Co-Founders, Thirst-Aid

    (created 9 filter factories in Myanmar)

Awards

  • BARKA Foundation’s business plan was a semi-finalist in the Global Social Venture Competition
  • Koosongo co-founder Esu Anahata won 1st Place in the Ariane de Rothschilds Fellowship business plan competition

Board of Advisors

2iE

Peter Chartrand

Curt & Cathy Bradner

The BARKA Foundation: c/o Ina & Esu PO Box 2, Burlington, ME 04417 | Tel: 413-446-7466
Foundation BARKA: BP 88 Fada N’Gourma, Burkina Faso, West Africa | Tel: 00 226 24 77 07 43 | www.barkafoundation.org

 

Water Accounting – An innovative method to establish local water needs

Water Accounting – An innovative method to establish local water needs

 

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For its work to bring safe water to the population of Burkina Faso’s Eastern region, The BARKA Foundation relies on the use of simple but effective methods to establish needs, monitor and document its own performance and ensure project success. Water accounting is one method which has proved extremely useful to BARKA and is particularly well adapted to this challenging environment. In line with BARKA’s mission to combine local and global solutions and low-tech and high-tech approaches, water accounting both relies on the skills of on-the-ground researchers and puts to use mobile phones, GPS, cloud-based servers, and cutting edge free and open source technology.
The use of water accounting allows us to gather detailed information on different communities’ water
uses and needs, to visualize these on maps, and to choose the locations with the greatest needs for water, sanitation & hygiene education (WASH) interventions. As part of BARKA’s efforts to support local synergies and cooperation, the data acquired from its research is openly shared with other actors of the local development sector. Availability of such up to date info on rural water needs can be of great importance to BARKA’s and other organizations’ planning of future projects since good documentation on the regional and village levels is often sorely lacking in Burkina Faso.
BARKA staffer Idrissa Yoni travels to every water source in the village, collects information, and marks each water point via GPS coordinates. He conducts surveys to better understand if water points are used for drinking, for gardening and economic activities, or for watering animals.
In one village BARKA surveyed, the extreme need for water was documented in the photos above in which a person had to descend into the well in order to fill a bucket with the small amount of dirty water that remained. This water will be used for cooking, washing and drinking.
A PROJECT OF THE BARKA FOUNDATION

The process of water accounting of the the water usage and needs consists of carrying out a survey of the target population (the investigation process), the uploading of the survey findings to the formhub (www.formhub.org) server, and the subsequent analysis of the collected data. During the investigation process, all the water points of a village are mapped using GPS. This mapping allows BARKA to see where the points of water access are in relation to the hamlets and village population and to determine where water is most needed.
An example of a map created using the method of Water Accounting: It shows the drinking water needs of Bouguy village.
Using the results of water accounting: Creating water points and raising awareness in rural communities
Water accounting makes it possible to determine several key elements of a holistic water system and its chief goal is to determine the ideal location for the building of new water points. However it is the face-to-face sensitization that BARKA implements on the ground with the community which leads to greater awareness of WASH issues and eventual behavior change.
Sensitization is also a key element in developing the awareness that safe drinking water is not free. Villagers are expected to contribute to the sustainability of their water points, including BARKA’s water projects. BARKA puts the village’s contribution of roughly US $700 to use by providing a village mechanic with training on how to properly maintain the well and even implement light repairs. However there are additional financial responsibilities which sensitization contributes to: villagers are taught about the need and importance of the collecting of small amounts of money from each water user to create a savings account which is used for future repairs and maintenance. Without this financial mechanism and the leadership of a water point committee and its association of water users, a well cannot be sustained by the village. Therefore this sensitization is a key ingredient to project success and the achievement of its goals.
The BARKA Foundation: c/o Ina & Esu PO Box 2, Burlington, ME 04417 | Tel: 413-446-7466
Foundation BARKA: BP 88 Fada N’Gourma, Burkina Faso, West Africa | Tel: 00 226 24 77 07 43 | www.barkafoundation.org

Hygiene Education through Social Arts

Hygiene Education through Social Arts

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Hygiene Education through Social Arts

With the Social Arts Program, BARKA and its financing partner One Drop (http://www.onedrop.org/) are bringing professional theatre for social messaging to Burkina Faso’s Eastern Region. The two organizations share the conviction that cultural arts can serve as an effective tool to facilitate debate about the value of water, importance of good hygiene practices, good governance, and the key role which women play in water resource management, to organically bring about behavioral change.

Technical assistance and trainings were provided by BARKA’s implementation partner Espace Culturel Gambidi (http://www.gambidi.org/) a Ouagadougou-based company which is widely recognized as a national and regional leader in theatre education and performance. The high quality standards the three partner organizations had set
for the program were reflected in the intensive five-week preparation period before the start of the performances. Local actors were chosen after an initial casting session and a one-week selection process. Ten performers were then prepared for the performances and helped to create the play in a comprehensive workshop led by two professional theatre acting coaches and directors.

The play ‘Water for the Present and for the Future’ was developed in collaboration between Espace Gambidi and The BARKA Foundation and is based on an original idea of BARKA’s social arts team. A total of 35 performances in villages and high schools brought this original creation’s fun and excitement but also its important social messages about responsibility in hygiene and water management to a sizeable part of the region’s population.

The play was performed in French at high schools and in the local language of Gulimanchema in the villages where French is not widely understood. Post-performance debates allowed the audience to take part, to engage with
the actors, and to give feedback on what had been presented. Student leaders in schools and water management committees in many villages committed to adopting and pursuing improved hygiene and water management practices.

Following the resounding success of the first edition of the Social Arts program, The BARKA Foundation and its partners are currently in the planning stages for the continuation of this innovative program. Your contribution can help us continue our engagement to bring crucial water and sanitation messages to Burkina Faso’s schools and villages.

Project Facts: Social Arts

  • Objective: Reinforcement of hygiene education through theatre and social art
  • Duration: March to May 2015
  • Estimated Number of Beneficiaries: 15,000 people directly by attending the performances; 31,000 indirectly
  • Total budget: 38,084 USD

A SOCIAL ARTS PROJECT THE BARKA FOUNDATION

The BARKA Foundation: c/o Ina & Esu PO Box 2, Burlington, ME 04417 | Tel: 413-446-7466
Foundation BARKA: BP 88 Fada N’Gourma, Burkina Faso, West Africa | Tel: 00 226 24 77 07 43 | www.barkafoundation.org

Water, Sanitation & Hygiene (WASH)

Water, Sanitation & Hygiene (WASH)

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A HOLISTIC APPROACH TO WATER, SANITATION & HYGIENE FOR COMMUNITIES AND SCHOOLS

The Fada WASH Project: 2014-2015

This integrated Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) project addresses the dire need for clean water and improved sanitation in 5 rural villages in Burkina Faso’s Fada Commune and eastern region. These villages were chosen because of their willingness to partner with the project, because they showed the greatest water and sanitation needs in the area, and because each village has a primary school with extreme need for improved WASH-in- Schools. To ensure good results and compliance with Burkinabè national standards we partnered with the Burkina Ministry of Water to oversee and monitor/evaluate all water & sanitation activities.

Water Services

  • The BARKA Foundation met with village leaders and stakeholders numerous times before launching any project activities to build relations, explain the project, and secure the full participation of the village through each step of the project
  • The goal is for the communities to engage fully in the decision-making process and to take responsibility for the improvement of their own lives
  • BARKA ensured that the project was implemented with “free prior and informed consent” – meaning that the people as a whole agreed to work together with project partners on the project
  • Each village raised funds to contribute toward the project, ensuring true ownership of all project outcomes and achievements
  • The BARKA Foundation conducted a “water accounting” exercise to identify every water point in each village through GPS; data was analysed to determine areas of greatest water needs
  • BARKA assisted the village to create an autonomously elected water committee
  • We trained this committee over 6 weeks to take responsibility for the management of the community’s water resources and to represent the village at each stage of the decision-making process
  • The water committee sensitized villagers of the need to collect small payments for the use of water, opened a bank account, and collected funds which will be used for future repairs to the well
  • Each village’s water committee selected a team of “hygienists” (which BARKA also trained over 4 months) to promote basic hygiene and serve as behavior change agents within the community

A HOLISTIC APPROACH TO WATER, SANITATION & HYGIENE FOR COMMUNITIES AND SCHOOLS

  • Villages contributed to the project with their labor, commitment and finances (approximately US $700)
    • Half of these funds were used to train a mechanic from each village to be able to repair and maintain thewell
    • The other half was given back to jump-start the village savings account started by the water committee
  • 4 deep borehole wells were drilled in the locations of greatest need
    • The water committee worked with the village to suggest ideal places for the well to the well driller
    • The well driller combined traditional divination (dowsing) with sophisticated hydro-geological testing todetermine the best location based on the village’s input
    • After wells were positively drilled, tests were conducted to determine the flow rate, water quality, andrecharge rate
    • In a final step the pump was installed and a concrete superstructure with a reservoir for animals wasconstructed

      Sanitation

  • Constructed gender-specific VIP composting latrines in 4 schools for students and teachers • Gender-specific latrines in schools have been proven to lower drop-out rates of girls
  • Worked directly with local grassroots groups (Parent Teacher Association, Students’ Mothers Association, etc.) to make commitments to assist in the process
  • BARKA works with local women’s associations to provide handmade traditional soap for schoolsHygiene Education
    • Established a robust and sustainable hygiene education program in communities and schools
    • Trained teachers in 4 schools for ongoing hygiene education for all students
    • Delivered essential supplies to schools such as locally produced handwashing stations, drinking stations, waterjugs for safe transport and storage and cleaning materials for the classrooms and latrines
    • Rural radio programming was used to engage villagers in debate and discussion about water resources,sanitation needs and hygiene principles; re-broadcasts expand impact throughout the region
    • A theatrical performance was created to reinforce hygiene education and social messages (how topractice good governance, the need to pay for clean water, and the key role women play in water resource management

      Results

      Through its community-led and holistic approach, BARKA facilitates the village to take ownership of the project and sustainably manage its own water resources.

How Extreme is the Need for Water in Burkina Faso?
The national standard is
one well for 300 persons. In Mangouargou, a hamlet of the village of Koaré, which was a part of this project, a single well had been serving 1600 people.

Increased Access to Potable Water

Improved Sanitation

Positive Behavior Changes

Better Heath, Good Governance, Greater Resiliance

Project Facts: Fada WASH Project

  • Objective: Increase access to water, improve sanitation and awareness of basic hygiene in 4 villages of the Fada N’Gourma region.
  • Project Partners: Rotary International, Crystal Rotary Club of Ouagadougou, USAID WA WASH, Winrock International, One Drop Foundation, Regional Direction of Water, BESER
  • Duration: October 2014 to October 2015
  • Estimated Number of Beneficiaries: 17,000 people directly; 31,000 indirectly
  • Total budget: $108,000 from Rotary International; $38,000 from One Drop for theatre sensitization;$100,000 in technical assistance from USAID WA WASH

The BARKA Foundation: c/o Ina & Esu PO Box 2, Burlington, ME 04417 | Tel: 413-446-7466
Foundation BARKA: BP 88 Fada N’Gourma, Burkina Faso, West Africa | Tel: 00 226 24 77 07 43 | www.barkafoundation.org